Nolloth Newz part 2

Since my first post on TB I changed jobs as mentioned and what a great decision that has proved to be. 
I joined Temuka Transport in June of last year after getting back from my holiday in the UK and Vietnam. I had been to see the boss before I went away who I knew beforehand through my partner and expressed my interest in joining the team to which he sounded keen. I knew that both companies had a good working relationship but without stepping on each other’s toes so I had to approach the matter with professionalism. I was completely honest with all involved and explained my reasons for wanting to change. 
I still loved the job at Pye Group but I felt the ever changing shift pattern didn’t suit my lifestyle anymore with my partner mostly starting around 5am whereas I could sometimes be starting at 11am. This meant we didn’t always get to spend a lot of time together especially in the evenings where I could be working until midnight if the job required. 
For me joining Temuka Transport meant earlier starts and in turn earlier finishes which was similar to my partners but also the chance to see more of this beautiful country whilst being paid to do so. 
Most of the time spent working for Pye Group was around the local area as is the case for most agricultural contractors. This was a great way for me to find my feet and gain some experience on Kiwi roads but I was ready to spread my wings. I had already experienced working for Temuka as whenever work was quiet at Pye Group they would sub me out, driver only so I had an idea of what it would be like.
Temuka runs a fleet of mostly Volvo’s with the odd exception having been acquired in business deals or takeovers. It is also the largest privately owned Volvo fleet in the Southern Hemisphere as stated by Volvo themselves in a recent magazine article. Within the company there are multiple divisions that include curtainsiders, containers, bulk, stock, bulk liquids (tanks) as well as a rural division that handles fert spreading and agricultural contracting. I have included a photo of each division which highlights the diversity of the company and trucks.

I initially signed up to do bulk liquids, moving fresh milk all around the South Island but before the season fully kicked off I was asked by the boss if I would take on a truck and call it my own in the bulk division. For me this was a no brainer as it meant stepping straight into a V4 FH 540 with a five axle trailer, getting consistently good hours throughout the season and a settled shift pattern. I was very lucky to be offered this truck as notoriously you have to work your way into a newer truck after proving yourself, the condition of how your gear is kept or length of service. I believe the boss already knew how I looked after my gear which played a part in me being given this truck. The truck I was given is also special within the company as it has the racing car artwork on the side of the cab as seen in the photos. This comes from the link between the family that own the transport company being good friends with the family of the son who became a professional racing driver and has won numerous titles in Australasia.  

Since getting the truck I have slowly been trying to restore it back to its former glory. It was starting to show signs of age with the odd bit of damage as well as a few missing bits here and there. I’ve also added my personal touch to it. Such additions include a custom made light board from the UK, front flaps under the bumper, marker lights in the mirrors, Union Jack sticker on the visor and I’m still waiting for my TB sticker (I’m getting more printed as the others haven’t arrived – TB) to arrive in the post. I’ve spent considerable time de-tarring the wheels and cab before getting around to polishing them with my efforts finally starting to show. I feel it’s really starting to take shape now with the Christchurch truck show in March being the next target. I’ve still got matching Volvo mudflaps and an air horn to add before the show. This show claims to be NZ’s biggest truck show and I will be attending with my camera ready to report back with some photos.
My usual working week consists of 6.30am starts Monday to Friday and a roster for Saturday work. I have also found myself covering Saturday shifts for some of my colleagues who are happy with just Monday to Friday. 
A large percentage of my work is spent taking coal straight from the mine to the nearby dairy factory. This work is repetitive where you can usually achieve five loads a day before making the two hour journey home again. This run is quite hard on the gear with rough roads and a steep gradient on entering the mine, never mind the state of my truck at the end of the day. I would include more photos of the mine but strict company policy insists on no photography whilst on their site. I did manage to get permission to take a photo of my truck whilst tipping off a load of ash whilst my trailer is jackknifed beside me, something I never thought I would be capable of doing. 
If I’m not moving coal then it could be fertiliser, grain or palm kernel. When moving these products it tends to take me north of base with the rare trip southbound. My favourite trips would be over to the west coast where the scenery is breath taking and so different to what I’m used to on the east coast. Numerous steep climbs through gorges and over mountain ranges, past picturesque lakes and along the coast line with the waves metres away from the road. Since arriving in NZ I’ve been adding pin drops to my google maps for when I revisit a location or share it with someone who hasn’t been and as you can see I have already been lucky enough to see a considerable chunk of the island. 

By Ed Nolloth.

TB Roving Reporter – New Zealand

I do get asked now and again if I’d like to hear or see photos and tales of others more fortunate than myself who have managed to get a job overseas doing something a little different to the UK norm. YES! I want to hear from you all and when you say “I’m not sure what to write” – trust me write what comes and most blog readers will love it. Next up is TB’s new roving reporter in New Zealand, Mr Ed Nolloth.

Firstly a bit about me. I’m 28 and originally from a sleepy village in Suffolk but now find myself trucking on the other side of the world. I started working in transport at the age of 20 and spent the next eight years working in the office of two well known Norfolk hauliers, starting out as a trainee traffic planner quickly working my way up the ranks. During this time I also acquired my C, C+E and Transport Managers CPC as well as other qualifications. 


Two years ago I found myself at a crossroads in life where I had spent seven years in an office and I felt a change was needed. It was time to try something new. I applied for a visa in New Zealand and before you knew it I was there, staying with distant relatives who I’d met once before in the UK and looking for work. I had been told work was in abundance in NZ and a week later I found myself working for a large agricultural contractor in the South Island and the rest is history as they say. I just finished two ‘seasons’ in New Zealand with a summer working for Transam Trucking sandwiched in between, something my good friend Mat Ireland got me involved with a few years back as his double driver. 

Working in NZ has positively changed my life and given me a different outlook on how to live. When comparing the UK to NZ I often list the followings differences; NZ has less people which is turn means less traffic. The weather is much better which in turn makes the people happier and in general friendlier but from a truck driving point of view there is far less legislation which in turn makes it far more enjoyable. The kiwi idea of a traffic jam is four cars waiting at a one lane bridge, a far cry from a thirteen mile queue on the M25. 

After nearly two years in NZ it’s starting to feel like a normal way of life but at first it was like an adventure, something a lot of truck drivers in the UK only dream about and for me this dream has become a reality. 
I worked for an agricultural contractor based on the Canterbury plains in the South Island of NZ with a fleet of mainly Volvo and Mercedes trucks. I was lucky enough to be rewarded with a brand new truck at the beginning of my second season and became rather attached to it. The hours and shift pattern was varied as to be expected for the type of work. During silage season it would be a mid morning start but this meant working into the early hours of the following morning. In my first year this didn’t faze me but the second year my situation changed as it often does and I met a young lady who was also a truck driver. 

When I first went over I had every intention of just spending six months out there and settling back into life as I knew it in the UK but I enjoyed it so much I was itching to go back. The job itself was awesome and everyday was different, spending most of time driving around paddocks and on challenging terrain. For me truck driving has always been about getting up before everyone else and getting ahead in your day, this turned out to be quite the opposite so it took me a little time to adapt. 
For those who don’t know the driving hours rules in NZ are very different. Firstly they still use paper log books, a far cry from digital tacograph cards. You are allowed to work up to fourteen hours a day every day with a ten hour break after each shift. During this fourteen hour shift you are permitted to take a thirty minute break after five and a half hours work. This means two breaks are required a day giving you a total of thirteen hours work a day. You are allowed to work up to seventy hours a week before a twenty four hour break is required and your week resets. On a drivers log book you only have a ‘work’ and ‘rest’ column which makes the whole process a lot easier than changing mode switches. As a British citizen with my C+E licence I am able to drive in NZ without sitting any practical or theory exams and there is no such thing as a CPC. I have recently acquired my NZ licence as I have plans to stay and this only involved a theory test to gain my class 5.
NZ has lots of different heavy vehicle combinations with the most common being a ‘truck & trailer’ which in UK terms would be an eight by four rigid followed by a two axle dolly attached to a three axle forty foot trailer giving you a maximum total length of twenty three meters. Another popular combination is a ‘B train’ where a tractor unit pulls two trailers. On my first day I was shown the truck & trailers in the yard and remember thinking there is no way I will ever be able to reverse this but it’s now like second nature. It’s safe to say my first attempt practicing between some road cones in the yard wasn’t pretty. 
The purpose of this blog was to prove it’s not as hard as people think to follow your dreams, anything is possible with a bit of hard work and determination. I have recently been back to the UK to visit family and upon my return I will be changing jobs for a new challenge having felt like I have achieved everything I wanted to from my previous one. I’m not one for changing jobs regularly but my new one will give me more time off with the chance of bigger trips around the country for more money. I’m even shopping my golf clubs out to NZ in the view of enjoying a round or two on my days off. 
Until next time…