New 579 for Peterbilt

Alright I’m a little behind on this one, but I am a sucker for a big American and I’ve always favoured a Pete’ over a KWhopper. I am on the Peterbilt mailing list, so here is a little bit of not so new news;

Peterbilt Motors Company announced a new era of class today with the launch of the bold and aerodynamic on-highway flagship, the new Model 579. Thoroughly redesigned, this major evolution of the Model 579 delivers outstanding improvements in Aerodynamics, Efficiency, Comfort, Technology and Uptime.

Peterbilt designers and engineers have delivered the most technologically advanced truck Peterbilt has ever built. The new 579 is also the most aerodynamic and fuel-efficient Peterbilt thanks to the new exterior design featuring a new sloped hood and optimized aero components, as well as the new 2021 PACCAR MX-13 and MX-11 engines and PACCAR transmission. Improved comfort will have drivers feeling right at home on the road with a 10% quieter cab and sleeper, additional storage, a new smart steering wheel and an improved Bluetooth microphone. Highlighting the New 579s innovative technologies is a class-leading 15” Digital Dash Display, delivering all the information drivers need in a clean, intuitive interface. In addition, the new 579 features Advanced Driver Assistance Systems providing drivers the latest safety technologies in the form of collision mitigation, lane departure warning and the new lane keeping assist (LKA), among others. Uptime is Peterbilt’s driving force. Peterbilt worked with over 50 of our customers to understand their unique operations and needs, incorporating their input into the design of the new 579. Validation units have already accumulated 1.5 million real world miles, and combined with the durability testing done at the PACCAR Technical Center, the new 579 is the most reliable truck ever designed by Peterbilt.

“The launch of the new Model 579 is a huge moment for Peterbilt and our customers. This new product is the result of five years of relentless focus on increasing fuel economy, taking driver comfort to new heights, and maximizing uptime. This new truck delivers the next level of performance for our customers and continues Peterbilt’s legacy of being the ‘Class’ of the industry,” said Jason Skoog, Peterbilt general manager and PACCAR vice president. The new Model 579 is available for order starting today (03/02/2021) in a day cab configuration, integral 80” UltraLoft sleeper and a variety of other sleeper sizes.

Developed over a five-year span, Peterbilt set out to perfect the look and aerodynamic shape of the new 579. Over 1,000 hours of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis and over 7.8 million CPU processing hours were spent evaluating the exterior design of the new 579. This research resulted in an enhanced aerodynamic profile and a 7% improvement in fuel economy. Achieving this feat meant no stone was left unturned.

Key exterior features to the new 579 include a redesigned stronger Metton® hood that is narrower and more resistant to damage. This is topped off with Peterbilt’s iconic aerodynamic “bird” ornament, a bright stainless steel grille and improved Halogen or optional LED headlights. A new 3-piece bumper integrates the forward radar cover for collision mitigation, with a larger aerodynamic air dam, and provides both protection against damage and lower replacement costs. Improvements to the aero mirrors, fairings, side skirts and closeouts help improve the overall aerodynamic shape with the revised A-pillar vane redirecting airflow around the windshield reducing friction and helping deliver a 10% noise reduction in the cabin. Peterbilt designers infused the new 579 with a look that is both bold and elegant. Already the best in the industry, the interior of the new 579 features soft-touch materials with a fit and finish that delivers an outstanding driver experience. The 579 UltraLoft with an integral sleeper provides 70 cubic feet of space, offering more storage than any comparable integral sleeper. Drivers will feel right at home with plenty of headroom from the eight-foot high ceiling. The cabin has room for small appliances, including a 1.1 cu ft microwave, a 32” TV, a tall wardrobe closet, multiple power outlets and optional bunkbeds with a clever fold-away ladder. Multiple windows provide plenty of natural light and additional ventilation. At night, interior lighting from dome LED lights and three directional spot/reading lights provide added convenience and safety. New sound abatement technology helps minimize outside noise creating a quieter cabin, both on and off the road. Small additions like a fixed cup holder and the option for multiple USB charging ports in the center console make life on the road more comfortable.

“Beautiful on and off the road, the new Model 579 raises the bar to a whole new level of aerodynamic performance and driver comfort. The boldness of the exterior design combined with the elegance of the interior space set the new 579 apart from the competition,” said Jason Skoog, Peterbilt general manager and PACCAR vice president.

The Peterbilt Digital Display fully integrates with electrical and safety systems found on the new 579 including the Bendix Fusion Advanced Driver Assistance System. The state-of-art 15” Digital Display features a fully customizable user interface (UI), delivering an almost endless combination of digital gauges on the main screen at any one time. Operators control the digital UI through one of three different Drive View Zones. Minimized View eliminates everything but the speedometer and tachometer for minimal driver distraction. Basic View represents traditional information found on analog dashes with Air & Oil Pressure, Fuel & DEF level and Water temperature all prominently displayed along with a speedometer and tachometer. The Enhanced View builds upon the previous views displaying the maximum number of gauges from a list of over 30 information sources. The beauty of the Peterbilt Digital Display is that operators can fine-tune the information shown to suit their individual needs through the easy to use controls found on the all-new steering wheel.

Prior to trip departure the Digital Display has the ability to run through a visual Systems Check, inspecting 13 systems and providing a green checkmark with each passed test. Post-trip, a detailed Trip Information screen provides a breakdown of important metrics of the most recent journey.

Peterbilt 579EV Climbs Pikes Peak

Peterbilt Motors Company is excited to announce that the Model 579EV is the first zero-emission,battery-electric, Class 8 truck to successfully reach the summit of Pikes Peak.

This significant achievement demonstrates the superior performance of the 579EV and its integrated battery-electric technology. Along with over 110,000 real-world miles on the Peterbilt EV fleet of trucks, this feat further proves that the 579EV is ready for real world, customer operations today. The significant achievement was captured on video and can be seen at https://youtu.be/dJLiFUf1h6w.

Peterbilt tackled the challenge of climbing to the top of Pikes Peak, or “America’s Mountain”, to highlight the 579EV’s excellent power capabilities and drivability, even under extreme road conditions and cold temperatures. The most famous mountain road in the United States, the ascent to Pikes Peak’s summit at 14,115 feet has an average grade of 7% and incorporates 156 turns over the last 12.42 miles.

Over a 3-day period, the 579EV made the journey up Pikes Peak multiple times with ease, each time using the recovered energy from regenerative braking on the descent to recharge the high-density battery packs to repeat each climb with ease.

​“The performance of the Model 579EV while navigating to the summit of Pikes Peak was nothing short of amazing. Handling the 156 corners was made easier thanks to the lower center of gravity provided by the battery location on the 579EV,” said, Darryl Oster, Peterbilt assistant chief engineer.

“This is a huge moment for Peterbilt and everyone who has worked countless hours to bring this truck to life. Being the first battery electric powered Class 8 truck to conquer one of the most iconic roads in North America is just the beginning. Peterbilt is leading the charge on commercial vehicle electrification, with three distinctive EV configurations available for customer orders today in a variety of applications,” said Jason Skoog, Peterbilt general manager and PACCAR vice president.

Happy Convoy Day!

Melissa : Why do they call you the Duck?

Rubber Duck : Because it rhymes with “luck.” See, my daddy always told me to be just like a duck. Stay smooth on the surface and paddle like the devil underneath

Melissa : But they’re all following you.

Rubber Duck : No, they ain’t. I’m just in front!

Rubber Duck : Here’s the plan: When we get to the pass, we’re gonna put on our fish costumes, pass out the Vaseline® an’ an extra ration o’ rum for the men. That should do it.

Peterbilt 389 Pride & Class Package Returns

A little bit of news across the water. I’ve been doing a lot of US Trucking during lock down. Watching lots of YouTube videos and done a bit of searching for used American trucks. There is still a massive fascination with the American metal and trucking across all 48 states, anyone want a driver??!! @Peterbilt do you need someone to drive one of these around the country for you???! Have a little read of this press release if you’re keen on a new Pete’ this could be the one for you;

Peterbilt Motors Company is proud to announce the return of the Model 389 Pride & Class package due to popular demand. Introduced with a limited production run in 2014 and 2017, the Model 389 Pride & Class package’s unique styling and touches of understated elegance truly set this truck apart from all others.

​Key external features of the Model 389 Pride & Class package include a highly polished hood crown surrounding a classic style louvered grille sheet, a brightly polished hood spine, chrome hood side accents, and polished hood fenders. The side of the truck is accentuated with polished rocker panels, bright cowl skirts, battery box, fuel tanks, and trimmed mud flaps. The iconic exterior look is finished off with a polished exterior sun visor, bumper, exhaust stacks and an exclusive Pride & Class emblem on the sleeper.

​The distinctive features of the Model 389 Pride & Class package continue on the inside of the truck as well with a luxurious Platinum Arctic Gray interior, charcoal dash top and Blackwood-finish trim accentsthroughout the cab. Premium black leather seats are embroidered with the Pride & Class logo on the headrests and go nicely with the black, luxury carpet lines found in the spacious cab and sleeper. Bright gauge bezels, a special steering wheel and Pride & Class emblems on the dash and accent trim round out the interior experience.

“The Model 389 Pride & Class package takes a place amongPeterbilt’s most iconic trucks. With unparalleled performance and distinctive design, it furthers our proud tradition of providing trucks with industry-leading styling, quality and value,” said Robert Woodall,Assistant General Manager Sales and Marketing.

The Model 389 Pride & Class is available now for order through Peterbilt dealerships.

The American Road Trip – Part 9

Eventually all good things come to an end and the adventure is over and we arrive in Portland, Oregon for the last race, but not before dinner at Hooters and a walk around town to see what’s going on. As it turns out it has more homeless drug addicts than I’ve never seen before.

So the journey ends here and it’s been a brilliant and eye opening experience as I mentioned earlier the team was badly managed but having spoken to others in motor sport since who have told me it’s better at other places but not by much so I’ve concluded that Motorsport definitely isn’t for me.

I’d like to say thank you to Dave Nickalls who I shared a truck with and who I have known for a few years now. We had a chance meeting 4 years ago in a German autohof, when he worked for Red Bull Racing. Dave has become a friend and worked for me driving my trucks a few times. Dave was also the one who invited me out to America and gave me the opportunity to take part in this trip.

The American Road Trip – Part 8

Once the race is over and the trucks loaded it’s the last drive the big one! 2050 miles in two and a half days. I haven’t written much about the actual driving yet so here it goes, how I see it. 

Most of the roads are straight flat and there isn’t much to look at so it’s necessary for the trucks to be able to do the same speed as cars as 56mph would be torture. The drawback is that it’s a lot more tiring as your always on it, trying to pass some or being held up by someone albeit not much as the car drivers in America get a move on as well unlike home! You’re not likely to encounter many people dawdling along in the middle lane at 50mph and if you do there doesn’t seem to be any rule against just undertaking them. In most places you can just use lane 3 in a truck anyway. As a result after 11 hours (which you can do every day of the week!) driving you do feel properly f**ked you can see why some drivers here feel to use amphetamines to stay awake when driving. As for the speed it work’s for the reasons mentioned and because of how the trucks are designed with the double drive bogies and axles on the back end of the trailers, they are surprisingly stable when tanking along at 75mph or even 92mph which I reached (accidentally honest) at one point. 

The cabs are brilliant to be honest. I think what we had was technically a fleet spec motor but still better than anything we have in Europe, the space is awesome and so comfortable it’s like driving around in a studio flat. The Freightliner itself is a nice truck, we never found out the horsepower of the trucks as it’s not written on the side of the motor or on the engines. The Detroit engine pulled well still doing 50mph loaded at 36 ton up some big hills easily as steep as Bourge-en-Bresse and as I said before they have the Merc gearbox working better than Mercedes do!

The last 4 hours of the drive are the best by far. We travel on the I84 which runs along the Columbia river and runs side by side a train track the views are stunning. It is up there with the best roads I’ve ever driven. The freight trains you run alongside are incredible we counted one to be 90 carriages long at least 1.5 miles but more likely 2 miles long!!

The American Road Trip – Part 7

The next day at the track we get our duties over with a lot quicker than we’d like, then go for a walk to see the sights. As you can imagine with the size of an Indy Car event, there are loads and loads of different trucks and vehicles. Race teams the world over use high spec, top quality trucks and Indy Car is of course no different, some may even say these are better than the rest! Big trucks, big paint jobs but still a few oddments. Just when you think you have seen an amazing cross section of US trucks, you come across a Ford Cargo!

The day cabbed Ford Cargo may be a rarity but not unique. What I am sure is unique in North America is a fully liveried in Liverpool Football Club colors, Volvo VN. Soccerball is not my sport, but some of your are football crazy, so if you move to the United States and want to personalize your truck…….well, paint it red and add some famous Scouse names and phrases and Robert is your mothers brother!

The American Road Trip – Part 5

Eventually once the torture is over, the race is cancelled 30 laps before the finish due to the weather, so it is time to pack away ready to head off for the next race. The next drive is 877 miles which is do-able on a double drive but not necessary so we are stopping in Indiana where most of the other teams are based. We are taken out for the night by Geoff, a former truckie for Carlin Motorsport who now works at a different team based in Indiana. Geoff takes us to a place called the 1911 grill which is a really cool sports bar and includes a ski ball alley, a shuffle board table and a go kart track… yes that’s right a go kart track!! Believe it or not, the best meal of the whole trip, a steak to die for!

The American Road Trip – Part 4

The next morning (05/09/19) we set off at 0800hrs to finish the last bit of the drive to the track. We spend the next few days setting up and working at the track which if I’m honest wasn’t very interesting. The time management at the team isn’t very good, so there’s a lot of time standing around with nothing to do and by a lot I mean around 9 hours a day, so there’s plenty of time to wander about and see what else is going on between duties.