MAN and Machines

It’s been a fair while since I have been able to do a good blog on the logistical magician that is Steve Marsh of Express fame. Recently the Marsh MAN has been seen frequenting the A55 and the green roads of Ireland, in fact this week he has two trips to the Emerald Isle booked. Last week however it was a different story. A lovely little bit of logistical excellence with minimal empty running. Load Northern England, tip and load Italy, then back to Northern England.

Marshy is based near Warrington in the North West of England, not a million miles from Liverpool. The job started on Thursday, with the loading of a transformer housing from Sherburn in Elmet in Yorkshire. The little MAN TGL was built to Marshys own strict requirements and although it added a fair amount of weight, the importance of a sliding roof on the 12 tonner has been proven over and over. The truck has everything required to load a large but sensitive item through the roof and transported over 1200 miles to its destination. Once loaded it’s off down the A1, A14, M11, M25, M2, A2 to Douvres. Boat to Calais and then off down through France, up and over Mont Blanc and into Italia.

Break time in the Alps

Once into Italy, time was ticking for Marshy to take a weekend break. Having got most of the way down towards Subbiano in Tuscany, Steve parked up Saturday afternoon in the last services before the delivery point to take a well earned rest through to Monday morning. Up and away Monday to Subbiano, tip the transformer housing off for testing and then straight on to the reload. What a nice little reload it was! So a little empty running from Subbiano upto Comezzano-Cizzago near Brescia, just the 246 miles, to reload a small aeroplane back to the UK, loading Monday evening.

Loading finished Monday PM, then it was back onto the autostrada and head towards the Blanc and a full retrace of his steps back to Calais. A couple of stops along the way to make sure the plane hadn’t moved were required by Mr Conscientious as you can imagine. The plane was only 300kg all in, made from carbon fibre and fitted with a litre 2 litre engine. The hardest part of the load were the wings according to Marshy as they were so light and couldn’t rub on each other.

#volvogate

Another Calais Dover crossing and then back up North to Kirkby near Liverpool. The plane was delivered on Thursday last week to a flying school on a farm, so the final stretch was probably the hardest part, down through a farm track, plenty of bumps and pot holes and not to mention the low trees! All said and done, it’s all in a days work for the little MAN and it’s pilot. Another round trip complete and another couple of happy customers. The trucks capabilities, the sliding roof, the tail lift to load and unload the plane…..experience is key people, experience… is… key…

A little mileage breakdown just for fun? Yea go on then, why not!

  • Empty – Warrington to Sherburn in Elmet = 72 miles.
  • Loaded – Sherburn in Elmet to Subbiano, Italy = 1230 miles.
  • Empty – Subbiano to Comezzano-Cizzago = 246 miles.
  • Loaded – Comezzano-Cizzago to Kirkby = 1002 miles.
  • Empty – Kirkby to Warrington = 19 miles.

To sum up then;

  • Total miles = 2569 miles.
  • Loaded = 2232 miles.
  • Empty = 337 miles.

Back on Main Land

Hello young Benjamin. Your favourite globetrotter checking in from Rarotonga we continue the journey west. This time to New Zealand, then up to Fiji and then across to Australia. While in New Zealand I was fortunate enough to get speaking to a driver from Mainfreight. The driver informed me that most of the trucks are owned by small operators and there’s a team from Mainfreight who’s job it is to make sure the trucks colours match their criteria, the exact paint etc. This is the reason the trucks look so good there compared to the badly presented ones we see in Europe. It’s just not the same standard. I also heard of a story about an outfit who painted up the whole rig and when Mainfreight came to inspect it they noticed something was off. It turns out the paint shop had used a slightly lighter shade of blue, so it had to go back and get redone. Above is a photo of a tidy Volvo that covers both the North and South islands of NZ. Also a few photos of a truck show I came across being set up.

Scania representing!
European styling is taking off here.

We also have a Tang spec Scania I spotted in Sydney. Notice the Irish flag in the visor lights.

As always, I love to hear about the trucks you find on your travels. The blog is worldwide so few free to share trucks with us from where ever you may be. I’d love to see some trucks from some of the small island nations if anyone is reading from somewhere far more tropical and sunny than Colchester today!! Thanks Joey, looking forward to the next instalment.

Pub Quiz – Rear End Wednesday

A great little quiz for the middle of the week. We all know our front views but how about your rear views??! Not quite rear of the year but Marshy sent in this photo on the ferry back from France earlier today.

The question being; from left to right what manufacturers are the three #littlebigcabclub members in the photo??

First to get all three correct wins a #littlebigcabclub sticker or two!

Italian MAN of Mystery

There is a bridge in Kent near Junction 9 of the M20, that has been known to have one of the longest serving truck photographers in the UK on it doing his thing. Mr Neil Jarrold has been photographing trucks since the 1980’s up and down the UK and across Europe, he is one of the originals and most of us at some point have seen or unknowingly shared some of his photos. I have known Neil for about 10 or 12 years now I guess, since my days at HC Wilson Transport when he used to call in to take a few photos, believe it or not. Realising Neil is a bigger truck perv than myself we soon became well acquainted. Here we are so many years later and Neil is still sending me awesome photos of my favourite kind of trucks…. #littlebigcabclub members from across Europe.

Neil sent me the above photo after his first visit to his beloved bridge for some time. This was two weeks ago today, so the little Italian MAN in focus is still a regular visitor to the UK. What a great photo and what a cracking little camion. This Italian company having been coming to the UK for a number of years now as Neil has sent me photos of this truck and others on the fleet before.

All three photos are of CT168JF and have probably been taken over the last 3-4 years. Very slight changes to the cab over that time but it’s still in great condition and well look after. According to the company website, Trea Á Trasporti are specialists in hanging garments and clothing. Bearing this in mind where do they go to in the UK? Does anyone else regularly see this little Italian stallion in the UK maybe at it delivery point? I’d guess it’s probably a regular job so hopefully one of you bloggers can tell me a little more. Maybe someone can even tag the Italian driver, Biondo, on Facebook. This truck is definitely worth a #littlebigcabclub sticker!

Neil keep the awesome photos coming and keep updating your Facebook page with your sightings; View from a Bridge Junc Nine Bloggers get hunting for this little MAN TGL while it’s here in the UK.