Peterbilt Special Edition 

Not often I get to feature press releases from outside of Europa but I’m very pleased to say that my American favourites, Peterbilt, have gladly sent over a press release for a new speacial edition 389. I’ll hand you over to the people from Denton, Texas. 

PETERBILT MODEL 389 CANADIAN 150TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION 

Peterbilt announces the Model 389 Canadian 150th Anniversary Edition to salute Canada’s history by combining the industry-leading quality and performance of the Model 389 with distinctive styling and exclusive Canadian features.
“Canadian owner-operators and premium carriers can honor Canada with the addition of Peterbilt’s Model 389 Canadian 150th Anniversary Edition,” says Kyle Quinn, Peterbilt General Manager and PACCAR Senior Vice President. “It delivers proven productivity, dependability and uptime combined with unique styling and understated elegance.”
The Model 389 Canadian 150th Anniversary Edition is configured with a 131-inch BBC and can be spec’d in 72- and 78-inch sleeper configurations.
Exterior features of the Model 389 Canadian 150th Anniversary Edition include:
– Louvered grille sheet reminiscent of the 1950’s Model 351 grille;

– Exhaust Stacks etched with “Canada 150”;
– Bright bumper with 150th Anniversary emblem;
– Bright rocker panels, cowl skirt and sunvisor;
– Polished battery box, fuel tanks and quarter fenders;

– Numbered Canadian 150th Anniversary Emblem on each side of the sleeper; 

– Special formulated Legendary Canadian red paint color.
Inside the cab, the Canadian 150th Anniversary Edition has exclusive features and branding that includes:
 Platinum-level Arctic Gray interior with a dark top dash with blackwood finish accents on the dash, doors, manual transmission shifter knob and sleeper cabinet trim; Peterbilt Premium Leather Seats Featuring a Maple Leaf on the Headrest; and Stylized steering wheel.
“The Model 389 Canadian 150th Anniversary Edition holds its own among Peterbilt’s most iconic trucks,” Quinn says. “Through unparalleled performance and unique design, it commands attention and furthers our tradition of providing trucks with industry-leading quality.”
The Model 389 Canadian 150th Anniversary Edition is available now for order through Peterbilt dealerships with production scheduled for May 15, 2017.

Special Scania – For Sale!!

Te Koop – Zum Verkauf – Till Salu – Per la Vendita – Pour la Vente – Para la Venta!!!

This very rare, very unique, very well loved Scania R560 is now for sale, due to a new replacement. The long list of spec is as follows; 

LHD V8 560 euro5

3.1. M wheelbase 

2 pedal automatic with overdrive 

Scania Retarder

Clutch still 100%

Brakes linings

71% 72%. F

70% 67%. M

83% 84%. R

1 owner from new

6×2 twin tag all on air

Special Types 

Front Axle – 8t air. 385/65 

Middle Axle – 12.7t air heavy duty 315/70 , 

Rear Axle – 8.3t air twin wheel 315/70

Alcoa Dura bright wheels centre trims on all wheels

Heavy duty Twin chassis 29t tractor 

Gross train weight 72,000kg

Low air slider 1150mm 

Full infill + between wings 

Rear lockers (easy removed )

Fuel 710ltrs NS 

320 ltrs OS

SB side skirts 

Change over box (exhaust)

Topline cab

Full BWS body work

Computer + 2x pto prep (this is needed if tipping gear/ crane/blower is ever fitted with auto box)

Air horns

Night cooling (not water) 

Twin sets of beacons

Head bored

Deep sun visor 4 spots

Running lights

Fogs 

Rear work lights x4

NATO + split charge 

Engine heater (plug in)

Fuel heater

Rear batteries (new )Cab scania black/grey 

lockers both sides

Both side lux seats

Full leather lux pack including large dash display 

Piano Blackwood/ leather steering wheel

Large bed 

Top bed 

Water night heater 

Microwave 

Fridge/freezer 

Coffee maker 

TV + sat

2din radio

CB

German toll

Side pockets rear (scania)

4 sets of keys 

Full scania service from new 

1 driver apart from 3 rescues bk to yard 😂

Registered Nov 2011

557,000 km

If you serious about this vehicle it comes with a big price tag but is one of a kind! Needs a new home soon but happy to wait for the asking price. Please email me; ben@truckblog.co.uk and title your email “Tasker Scania”

Show Truck Stacks Up

As we know Eminox supplies bus, truck, non-road mobile machine and rail manufacturers around the world, as well as being the major European supplier of emission control exhaust systems for retrofit to vehicles already in service. For more information, please visit www.eminox.com


Eminox Case Study: April 2017

This award winning show truck from Ian Maclean has now been finished off with classic Eminox twin stacks. Ian was looking for the perfect finishing touch for his Scania 143M show truck, it is branded Peter Roff in tribute to the haulage operator. All his vehicles were fitted with Eminox stacks, so this was the ideal way to complete the look. 


He contacted Eminox’s Stoke centre, who specialise in Custom exhausts, including stacks, tailpipe conversions and sidepipes, in April 2016. Images of previous show trucks helped the Eminox team to understand what Ian wanted, various ideas were discussed. The final decision was to go with high top twin stacks, but also incorporate a switch over valve and twin side pipes.


The system was fitted by engineers at Eminox’s Stoke centre over 4 day’s with updates being sent to Ian, we think the result is 10/10. Ian says, “This is exactly the end result we had dreamed of for our award winning show truck.” He knew Eminox was the only way to go! To view the full custom exhaust range, including the iconic stack design, please visit: www.eminox.com/exhaust-conversions 

To enquire about an exhaust conversion, please call: 01782 206300 or email: ​ stoke@eminox.com 

The Golden Days with a SuperMAN! 

Watch out it’s going to get rather romantic I think! I wasn’t about in the golden days of trucking I was a mere ankle biting pain in my parents backside. As a lad and as I’ve told you many times before I longed for my driving licence and to be heading off to far flung places but I admit my golden days are very different to the general term of the 70’s and 80’s and also very different to everyone’s own good old days. No matter your age, country or work, if you’re a driver you’ll have your own favourite job, workplace and truck. Not necessarily your first or last, or even the most expensive but the one job you’ve loved, the job that made you think; “I love my job!”. I maintain to this day that if you haven’t had at least one day like that then more fool you for doing a job that underneath it all you don’t enjoy. For me those days were the second truck I owned as an owner driver at the tender age of 20ish, an MAN 8.163, 7.5 tonner. 

The little German really earned her keep. No speed limiter back then meant there were plenty of days that packed the best part of 1000km into my “10” hours driving. I’m no hero and don’t claim to be a nonstop 24 hours a day at the wheel type, but most of you at some point would have and probably have found the old fashioned ways of bending the rules to get a job done, or to get you to a load point or even home. This little lorry never let me down and got me to different places day in day out. Various jobs entrusted to me meant that I was the only truck on the job and often I’d have deliveries to the same destination one week and then onto another project the next week. Maybe Braintree to Cheltenham and Gloucester and back. Maybe Chelmsford to Swindon and back. May be three days of Braintree to Carmarthen and back. 270 miles one way, that’s 4.5 hours at 60mph. I could just about do it in 9 hours and I think the worst day was a 10 hour drive. Thankfully I am just on the edge of remembering the good days of the M25 when you could get round it without stopping at most times of the day. The little MAN was up for it all. If only there had been more European trips I really would have been in seventh heaven. 

This was my second truck so perhaps as the whole driving thing and freedom had passed and I was just intent on doing as much work as I possibly could. This was where I adopted the phrase “Long Days, Late Nights” a sticker of which would appear on the doors of all my other trucks. At this point I’m not sure anything could have stopped me loving everyday on the road quite so much. We all love the open road and seeing the world go by through the windscreen otherwise we wouldn’t be doing the job. Getting up to Larkhall in Scotland three times a week and reloading from Newcastle-upon-Tyne back to Essex and Suffolk, it was awesome. How much I picked up on these trips from old hands who really had been there and done it and are probably still doing it! For me part of the job was the people you met and what you could glean from them. These days it drives me nuts that the majority seem to park up and go to bed or plug in their Playstations. When I did park up I’d get out the cab and go and find a like minded person to spend the evening with and chat. You could learn new routes, new ways to do things, even learn about delivery points,  all info that isn’t written down but is (for want of a better phrase), driving folklaw. A new one GW!. All this just made me love the job I loved even more. What wasn’t there to love?? and ontop of all I was making money. 

Good old days indeed. I’d spend my money on what I thought were decent accessories for the little MAN. I think it started with a box full of lights and stainless steel from the then biggest name in the USA, Panelite. Then came new stainless steel rear door hinges, handles and brackets. A set of Speedline alloy wheels from Tyretracks of Eccleshall. Always Michelin Tyres. I know some of you even remember the “barbers pole” I painted on the prop shaft?! and so it went on. I’ve always been of the mentality that the truck is what sells my company to those who don’t know me. Definitely the case when the airbrushed Atego came along. I like to think the truck wasn’t over the top but showed that I cared for it and in turn cared for people’s cargo. Regular cargos of sunbeds, to tail lifts to computers and farm machinery. Often with comments on how smart the little truck was. Add everything together and I think it’s fair to say that you can see why these were my own golden days. At the end of the day I was young, successful and driving what I thought was the best looking 7.5 tonner in the UK, apart from Frank Hudson Transport of course! 

The Forgotten Art of Map Reading

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Way back when in 1997 mobile phones were just becoming part of my everyday life and it was a handy gadget to have especially as I had just bought my first 7.5 tonner at the age of 17 and I had started subbing for DFDS at Coggeshall, Essex. The one thing I would never have believed back then was that now a days there would be a gadget in in the cab that would have saved me from learning  what felt like every street across Essex, Suffolk, Norfolk, Cambridgeshire, Northamptonshire, Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire, Berkshire, Hampshire, Surrey, West Sussex, East Sussex, Kent and last but definitely not least, Greater London. In my first week I was given a day in London with something like 15 drops across the Greater London area, nice. Oh for those who aren’t sure, Greater London is probably easier described as everywhere inside the M25 circle. So age 17, 1st week of owning and driving my first Tonka toy and 15 drops across one of the worlds busiest cities, where do I start???! One of the other DFDS subbies said “Don’t worry son, just get yourself a hard back copy of the Master Atlas of Greater London and you’ll be fine.” – I couldn’t have had any better advice than that. So on the way down the A12 I stopped at a garage and found a copy of the London bible.

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So just take this in for a minute, its 1997, I had X amount of drops (& collections) across the capital, a list of addresses, not many with postcodes and TWAT SAT NAV was no where to be seen. How did we ever cope I hear you ask. Pull up a sand bag and I’ll tell you a story. Once upon a time you could stop at a garage and buy these little paper paged books called road maps. You could buy them for counties or towns depending on what you required and basically they had pages full of the layout of your selected area. At the back was an index with a full list of roads and estates and these were listed with a page number and grid reference so you could find the road on the page in the map, amazing huh?? Using one of these town maps along side a bigger road Atlas you could pretty well find any where you wanted to go, all on your own without 22 satellite’s guiding you down an unsuitable one way street! Or even better than using the road map you’ve just bought you could use what we used to call common sense, most people had a bit of common sense as it was gained from parents and the school of hard knocks and tough luck. For example your honour; Station Road, Anytown. First up have a look on your map (if you have one of that area/town) and look for station road in the index or just for the station. If there is no visible station have a look to find the closest road to a railway line, simple. Again using a bit of common sense and a good map you can even work out where an old railway might have been. If you haven’t got a map you could always head towards the town and see if you could pick up the sign posts for the station. Or last but not least you could ask the local and they’d send you right round the town and back to where started and in the mean time with a bit of luck you’d stumble across Station road.

Now in London the streets are a plenty and the traffic lights and junctions are even more. So having to keep an eye on your hard back atlas was very easy or convenient so I found it best to tear the A4 page out. See the photo above. Still an A4 page isn’t so easy to hold, so when you are close enough you can fold the page to A5 size. Then finally when I was really close to where I needed to be I would fold again so its small enough to hold in finger and thumb. Please see my thumb below. I have to say that in day to day driving it was very much find your own way to your destination, no typing in a postcode and follow the arrows on your dash-mounted screen. All drivers back in these prehistoric times had to have a sound knowledge of the UK’s road network and most industrial towns and somehow we managed. In a previous life as a transport manager I watched a driver heading from Ipswich to Leamington Spa take the A14, M6, M42, M40 to his destination. When I quizzed him to why he went this long way round, I got the response “That’s what sat nav said”. Now call me an old stick in the mud but I asked if he had looked at his road atlas to check where he was going and I got a short silence and then the response “I haven’t got one”. Not impressed I confiscated the drivers twat sat nav for the following week. Now I hope he has a slight knowledge of the road network. Anyway I digress.

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The beauty of a paper map over a twat sat nav is that I find I can always see more than I need to, which can only ever help you know where you are and what your surroundings are. For example heading into London the other Saturday as a passenger I decided we would have a Map-Off. This was fine and a good contest and we both arrived at the right place with no major dramas, but along the way I could check each street I passed and I could see how far ahead the next turning was, without having to wait for the 200 metre warning or what ever it is. Also looking at the map you can get some idea of what the road you are turning into is like or which way it goes, something which twat sat nav can’t do very well. The one downside I found to the paper map is that it doesn’t light up when you enter a tunnel!!

I challenge any driver who isn’t a map reader to take up the challenge and try and get yourself across the country with no twat sat nav. At the end of the day you might just find that you have some sort of new found satisfaction in your day to day job. Twat Sat navs do have their uses and I for one do like that fact they can tell you how far you are from your destination and I can never argue against the fact that some one shouting directions at you is far safer than reading a map while driving along or each time you stop. My biggest fear is that the beauty of a good map is lost on all new drivers. Where’s the sense of direction that you all had to find the nearest sweet shop when you were a kid? Does anyone else agree that all drivers should have an understanding of where about’s they are in the country and what other roads are available to the one your on with no help from the NASA convention on your dashboard?? In the worst case we know that at 12 o’clock the sun is in the west and we want to be just to the right of that, so we best take that tangent………………..

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